Why is it hard to get Shared Parenting Bills passed?

In 2004, a public policy question was put to Massachusetts voters regarding shared parenting. Shared parenting is a rebuttable presumption that parents should have joint physical and legal custody of children, which may be rebutted by evidence that one parent is unfit (i.e., he or she is drug dependent, violent, absent, abusive, neglectful, etc.) or that it is not workable through no fault of one of the parents.

The public policy question was put on about 25 percent of all districts and garnered 87 percent public support. Because the number of districts was so high, its accuracy as a barometer of public sentiment is beyond all reasonable dispute.

However, two legislative cycles after the landmark 2004 public policy question, shared parenting did not become the law in Massachusetts. Gov. Deval Patrick has publically indicated his support for shared parenting, yet that has not prevented shared parenting legislation from twice dying. Given such overwhelming support by the Massachusetts voting public and the psychological community, why hasn’t shared parenting been passed into law?

feminist extremists and greedy trial lawyers is the ANSWER

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

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One response to “Why is it hard to get Shared Parenting Bills passed?

  1. As usual, compelling and persuasive information. Nice post Jerry !

    Andy

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